Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Allocate Your Resource to Fulfill Your Strategy

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“In the end, a strategy is nothing but good intention unless it’s effectively implemented.”

Problem of resource allocation 


The problem of implementing a strategy is the limited resource. So, we need to carefully select the resource for the right strategy.

Innovator Dilemma

Unfortunately, resource allocation is not an easy task. Often, we face the conflicting goals. For example, short-term goals usually conflict with long-term goal. The goals of entrepreneurs usually conflicts with that of big companies.   

In Career

The problem gets even worse when evaluation criteria of a company are in conflict with the company mission. The company would like to become greater over time, but it evaluate the employee on a yearly basis. So, very few people would focus on building the company. Rather, they would focus on making themselves look good in one year.

In Life

A lot of people sets out having a great plan. But, often, you cannot follow or inadvertently diverge from the plan. You want to build something great to society, even if you don’t earn a lot of money. But you can’t help seeing all of your friends earning good money, driving flashy cars, and living in a big house. In life, we make decision all the time. And, it’s hard to be aware of whether your decision is aligned with your goals.

Watch Your Resource

So, how do you know that what you do is aligned with your goal? A simple approach is to watch your resource--your time, your money, etc. Try to review whether your spent resource helps fulfill your goals.

“To understand the company’s strategy, look at what they actually do, rather than what they say they’ll do.”--Andrew Grove, Intel CEO and co-founder.         

Source: How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton M. Christensen, James Allworth, and Karen Dillon

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Book or Audiobooks?

Personally, I prefer audiobooks. It's fun, and I can listen when I'm doing something else. It also makes other activities (e.g., jogging) a lot more fun. For more detail about audiobooks, please read [this post].

There is one more reason that may encourage you to go for the audiobook version. You can get it now for FREE. Audible offers you a free trial for 14 days. Even if you get the book and cancel the subscription right away (so that you don't have to pay), you can keep the book. And, don't worry if you lost the audiobook file. Just log into audible.com. You can keep downloading the over and over again.

   About the summary: It takes time to finish up a book. And, when you do, sometimes, you want to review what you learn from the book. If you do not make  notes as you read, you might have to go through the book once again. This can be time-consuming when you are dealing with a book. But you can still flip through the book and locate what you are looking for.

However, when the material is an audiobook, it is extremely hard to locate a specific part of content. Most likely you will have to listen to the entire audiobook once again.

This book summary will help solve the pain of having to go through the book all over again.

I am leaving out the details of the books. Most books have interesting examples and case studies, not included here. Reading the original book would be much more entertaining and enlightening. If you like the summary, you may want to get the original from the source below.

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