Friday, December 27, 2013

Villains and Heroes


    Every hero needs a villain. If your solution is a hero, the problem your solution solves will be a villain. So, you need to know who you villains (i.e., problems) are. But, more importantly, you need your audience to know who the villains are.

Pain Helps

        People think in relative. So, you need something, a villain, to compare with your hero. Make people realize the pain of the problem they are facing, and they will be interested in your solution. 


“...this us-versus- them strategy attracts fans, incites controversy, creates loyalty, and gets us thinking—and arguing—and, of course, buying.”--Martin Lindstrom

From General to Specific

        Our brain think in big picture before filling in details. Always introduce the problem in a big picture before giving the detail of your solution to solve it.

A Villain in One Sentence

        When creating a villain, you need to do it quick and you need to do it short. Use a few minutes to create a villain. Create a sentence which answers the following questions:
  • What do you do?
  • What problem do you solve?
  • How are you different?
  • Why should I care?

“Remember, nobody cares about your product. People care about solving their problems.”

Heroes and Benefits

       Once you show the heroes, the benefit must be emphasized immediately. You should tell your audience immediately ‘why should they care?’
Source: The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs: How to Be Insanely Great in Front of Any Audience 
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Book or Audiobooks?

          Personally, I prefer audiobooks. It's fun, and I can listen when I'm doing something else. It also makes other activities (e.g., jogging) a lot more fun. For more detail about audiobooks, please read [this post].     
          There is one more reason that may encourage you to go for the audiobook version. You can get it now for FREE. Audible offers you a free trial for 14 days. Even if you get the book and cancel the subscription right away (so that you don't have to pay), you can keep the book. And, don't worry if you lost the audiobook file. Just log into audible.com. You can keep downloading the over and over again.

    About the summary: It takes time to finish up a book. And, when you do, sometimes, you want to review what you learn from the book. If you do not make  notes as you read, you might have to go through the book once again. This can be time-consuming when you are dealing with a book. But you can still flip through the book and locate what you are looking for.

However, when the material is an audiobook, it is extremely hard to locate a specific part of content. Most likely you will have to listen to the entire audiobook once again.

This book summary will help solve the pain of having to go through the book all over again.

I am leaving out the details of the books. Most books have interesting examples and case studies, not included here. Reading the original book would be much more entertaining and enlightening. If you like the summary, you may want to get the original from the source below.


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